Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis Treatment

Our physicians practice the art of Colon and Rectal Surgery exclusively. We treat a large number of patients suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease, including Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

What is Crohn’s disease?

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory process primarily involving the intestinal tract. Although it may involve any part of the digestive tract from the mouth to the anus, it most commonly affects the last part of the small intestine (ileum) and/or the large intestine (colon and rectum).

Crohn’s disease is a chronic condition and may recur at various times over a lifetime. Some people have long periods of remission, sometimes for years, when they are free of symptoms. There is no way to predict when a remission may occur or when symptoms will return.

What are the symptoms of Crohn’s disease?

Because Crohn’s disease can affect any part of the intestine, symptoms may vary greatly from patient to patient. Common symptoms include cramping, abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, weight loss, and bloating. Not all patients experience all of these symptoms, and some may experience none of them. Other symptoms may include anal pain or drainage, skin lesions, rectal abscess, fissure, and joint pain (arthritis).

What is ulcerative colitis?

Ulcerative colitis is an inflammation of the lining of the large bowel (colon and rectum). Symptoms include rectal bleeding, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, weight loss, and fevers. In addition, patients who have had extensive ulcerative colitis for many years are at an increased risk to develop large bowel cancer. The cause of ulcerative colitis remains unknown.

Ulcerative colitis Treatment

Initial treatment of ulcerative colitis is medical, using antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications such as aminosalicylates. If these fail, prednisone can be used for a short period of time but long-term use can be associated with significant side effects. If prednisone is ineffective or cannot be discontinued, immunomodulators such as 6-mercaptopurine or azathioprine can be used to control active disease that does not merit hospitalization. In order to maintain control of the disease, aminosalicylates or immunomodulators are used on a long-term basis. “Flare-ups” of the disease can often be treated by increasing the dosage of medications or adding new medications. Hospitalization may be necessary to put the bowel to rest and deliver steriods directly into the blood stream.

Contact us to schedule an appointment and learn more about Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis Treatment.